Discussion:
Why I'm Not Voting for Trump or Hillary
(too old to reply)
Ubiquitous
2016-11-08 20:54:17 UTC
Permalink
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.

I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor, an almost comical
narcissist and a reflexive bigot. I'm not easily offended, and he has
offended me pretty consistently over the course of this campaign,
beginning with his announcement speech. The list is as familiar as it
is long: His mockery of POWs, his ridicule of the disabled, his
reliable misogyny, his open prejudice, his casual and unapologetic
dishonesty, his contempt for ideas and people who care about them.

As I think about the future of the country and the lives of my three
(soon to be four) children, two challenges stand out: national security
and debt. Government shouldn't do much, but it should keep its citizens
safe and it should not burden future generations with debt incurred by
politicians making promises to current ones. Trump complains about the
$20 trillion in debt and opposes reforming the entitlements most
responsible for it. His views on national security range from aspiring
authoritarian to naïve neo-isolationist, and his decisionmaking in
matters of world affairs appears to be driven by ego and bravado rather
than any kind of worldview or national strategy. There is, in my view,
no chance a Trump presidency would seriously address the debt and a
good chance that it would increase global instability and threats to
the U.S. homeland.

Trump doesn't believe in limited government—at all. To the extent he's
made limited government arguments during the campaign, he's done so for
transparently political reasons. But he's also repeatedly made clear
his comfort with a powerful, intrusive federal government. He's argued
for severe restrictions on the First Amendment, for dramatically higher
taxes, for expanded entitlements, for new regulations on businesses,
for single-payer health care. To the extent Trump has views about
policy that don't directly affect his own well being, he is a
progressive.

So, no—I'm not voting for Donald Trump. (For more of my concerns about
Trump, click here and here.)

And despite the fevered speculation of some Trump supporters, I will
not vote for Hillary Clinton, either. She has campaigned for president
as an extension of the Obama presidency, which has been disastrous,
particularly on the urgent issues of debt and national security. If
that alone weren't enough to disqualify her, then her almost
contemptuous disregard for the rules and laws that govern other public
officials and the rest of the country surely is.

This isn't new. In 1996, William Safire memorably described Mrs.
Clinton as a "congenital liar." In hindsight, that seems almost
generous, as if her behavior was inherited, not chosen. In light of
what we've seen since, we could add other, more accurate descriptors.
She's a habitual liar, an aggressive liar, an arrogant liar. She's a
comfortable liar, an unrepentant liar, even an eager liar. Go back and
review her press conference at the United Nations on March 10, 2015.
She offered excuses and justifications and explanations for her private
email server—and virtually everything she said about it was misleading
or flat-out untrue. (For more of my concerns about Clinton, see here.)

It's no wonder, then, that so many Americans dislike the two major-
party candidates. When Fox News asked voters in late August whether
they believe "Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are terrible
candidates", nearly half of the country (44 percent) responded in the
affirmative. An NBC poll out this week found that 62 percent of
Americans say the election has made them feel "less proud" of America.
(In 2012, only 12 percent said the same thing.)

I'm one of them. So, what should I do? Among the best things I read as
I considered this question was an article published this summer from
Matthew Franck. He writes:

Neither Trump nor Clinton has a single redeeming characteristic
that recommends him or her to the presidency of the United
States—at least none that is not decisively outweighed by some
other damning characteristic. Clinton's much vaunted
"experience" is a career record of ghastly misjudgments in
foreign policy, paired with a consistently authoritarian and
illiberal "progressivism" in domestic policy, seemingly intent
on unraveling the social fabric that makes a decent society.
And there is no need to rehearse her and her husband's history
of dishonesty, corruption, and irresponsibility, capped most
recently by her obvious breach of the statutes protecting
national security secrets.

As for Trump, was there ever a candidate more obviously
unqualified for high public office, as measured by his dearth
of relevant knowledge and experience, his willfulness and
self-absorption, his compulsive lying and inconsistency, his
manipulative using of other people, his smash-mouth rhetoric
and low character? For anyone professing conservative
principles, the first problem with Trump is that he is not
one of us, has never been one of us, shows no sign or capacity
of becoming one of us, and hardly cares to pretend to be one
of us. Even "what about the Supreme Court?" has no grip on my
conscience when I try to imagine Donald Trump in the Oval
Office. I cannot trust him to choose judicial nominees wisely,
and there are other things whose cumulative weight is greater
even than this variable.

He concludes:

After a lifetime of studying politics, I have finally, thanks
to the electoral annus horribilis of 2016, arrived at an ethic
of voting that I can defend against all rival ethics. It is
simply this: Vote as if your ballot determines nothing
whatsoever—except the shape of your own character. Vote as if
the public consequences of your action weigh nothing next to
the private consequences. The country will go whither it will
go, when all the votes are counted. What should matter the
most to you is whither you will go, on and after this
November's election day.

Pretty good advice.

My vote won't affect the outcome of the race for president. I live in
Maryland, a reliably blue state in presidential years. But even if I
lived in a swing state, I'd make the same choice.


I wrote in Senator Mike Lee.

Lee is a principled conservative. He is a thoughtful and consistent
advocate for limited government. He is a constitutionalist not because
it's popular these days but because he believes in the precepts of
founding.

I don't agree with Senator Lee on everything. I have concerns about his
proposals on criminal justice reform, and his views on national
security are more non-interventionist than mine. But our differences
come in considering how to limit government, not whether to limit it.

Lee has refused to endorse Donald Trump. But he has nonetheless tried
in good faith—in public and in private—to encourage Trump to embrace
those things he considers important. And he has given serious,
substantive reasons for his decision. (See my interview with Lee from
the Republican National Convention this summer, here.) Opposing the
nominee of your party, even one as deeply flawed as Donald Trump, takes
a certain amount of political courage. And with the exception of Ben
Sasse, Jeff Flake, Larry Hogan, and Charlie Baker, too few elected
Republicans this year have shown it.

So, Mike Lee for President.

Or one vote for Mike Lee, anyway.
--
BREAKING NEWS
In other news, somehow Crooked Hillary still isn't in prison...
Wayne
2016-11-08 21:41:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump.
Then you have signed on as not caring about:
1. Batshit crazy supreme court nominees
2. Government pay to play,,,give the Clinton Crime Cartel money and they
will assure favorable treatment by the US government
3. Assumption of local and state functions by the feds
4. Open border to Mexico similar to the crossing while driving from AZ to NM
5. A French style socialist government
6. Voting by anyone who shows up
7. Federal restrictions on your 1st amendment rights for non-PC speech
8. What the hell....let's just suspend the entire bill of rights in
favor of a government that knows best.
Ted
2016-11-08 22:21:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne
Post by Ubiquitous
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump.
1. Batshit crazy supreme court nominees
2. Government pay to play,,,give the Clinton Crime Cartel money and they
will assure favorable treatment by the US government
3. Assumption of local and state functions by the feds
4. Open border to Mexico similar to the crossing while driving from AZ to NM
5. A French style socialist government
6. Voting by anyone who shows up
7. Federal restrictions on your 1st amendment rights for non-PC speech
8. What the hell....let's just suspend the entire bill of rights in favor
of a government that knows best.
Re: #8. Don't joke. It's what some of them are already openly suggesting.
Well, not a suspension, but a rewrite. ("Four legs good, two legs better.")
--
"This troll is one of the dumbest, most opinionated, most blinkered and
also the most arrogant septic idiots one can come across."
Ted
2016-11-09 01:02:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted
Post by Wayne
Post by Ubiquitous
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump.
1. Batshit crazy supreme court nominees
2. Government pay to play,,,give the Clinton Crime Cartel money and they
will assure favorable treatment by the US government
3. Assumption of local and state functions by the feds
4. Open border to Mexico similar to the crossing while driving from AZ to NM
5. A French style socialist government
6. Voting by anyone who shows up
7. Federal restrictions on your 1st amendment rights for non-PC speech
8. What the hell....let's just suspend the entire bill of rights in favor
of a government that knows best.
Re: #8. Don't joke. It's what some of them are already openly suggesting.
Well, not a suspension, but a rewrite. ("Four legs good, two legs better.")
--
"This troll is one of the dumbest, most opinionated, most blinkered and
also the most arrogant septic idiots one can come across."
bookoflife.org
2016-11-08 21:49:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor, an almost comical
narcissist and a reflexive bigot. I'm not easily offended, and he has
offended me pretty consistently over the course of this campaign,
beginning with his announcement speech. The list is as familiar as it
is long: His mockery of POWs, his ridicule of the disabled, his
reliable misogyny, his open prejudice, his casual and unapologetic
dishonesty, his contempt for ideas and people who care about them.
As I think about the future of the country and the lives of my three
(soon to be four) children, two challenges stand out: national security
and debt. Government shouldn't do much, but it should keep its citizens
safe and it should not burden future generations with debt incurred by
politicians making promises to current ones. Trump complains about the
$20 trillion in debt and opposes reforming the entitlements most
responsible for it. His views on national security range from aspiring
authoritarian to naïve neo-isolationist, and his decisionmaking in
matters of world affairs appears to be driven by ego and bravado rather
than any kind of worldview or national strategy. There is, in my view,
no chance a Trump presidency would seriously address the debt and a
good chance that it would increase global instability and threats to
the U.S. homeland.
Trump doesn't believe in limited government—at all. To the extent he's
made limited government arguments during the campaign, he's done so for
transparently political reasons. But he's also repeatedly made clear
his comfort with a powerful, intrusive federal government. He's argued
for severe restrictions on the First Amendment, for dramatically higher
taxes, for expanded entitlements, for new regulations on businesses,
for single-payer health care. To the extent Trump has views about
policy that don't directly affect his own well being, he is a
progressive.
So, no—I'm not voting for Donald Trump. (For more of my concerns about
Trump, click here and here.)
And despite the fevered speculation of some Trump supporters, I will
not vote for Hillary Clinton, either. She has campaigned for president
as an extension of the Obama presidency, which has been disastrous,
particularly on the urgent issues of debt and national security. If
that alone weren't enough to disqualify her, then her almost
contemptuous disregard for the rules and laws that govern other public
officials and the rest of the country surely is.
This isn't new. In 1996, William Safire memorably described Mrs.
Clinton as a "congenital liar." In hindsight, that seems almost
generous, as if her behavior was inherited, not chosen. In light of
what we've seen since, we could add other, more accurate descriptors.
She's a habitual liar, an aggressive liar, an arrogant liar. She's a
comfortable liar, an unrepentant liar, even an eager liar. Go back and
review her press conference at the United Nations on March 10, 2015.
She offered excuses and justifications and explanations for her private
email server—and virtually everything she said about it was misleading
or flat-out untrue. (For more of my concerns about Clinton, see here.)
It's no wonder, then, that so many Americans dislike the two major-
party candidates. When Fox News asked voters in late August whether
they believe "Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are terrible
candidates", nearly half of the country (44 percent) responded in the
affirmative. An NBC poll out this week found that 62 percent of
Americans say the election has made them feel "less proud" of America.
(In 2012, only 12 percent said the same thing.)
I'm one of them. So, what should I do? Among the best things I read as
I considered this question was an article published this summer from
Neither Trump nor Clinton has a single redeeming characteristic
that recommends him or her to the presidency of the United
States—at least none that is not decisively outweighed by some
other damning characteristic. Clinton's much vaunted
"experience" is a career record of ghastly misjudgments in
foreign policy, paired with a consistently authoritarian and
illiberal "progressivism" in domestic policy, seemingly intent
on unraveling the social fabric that makes a decent society.
And there is no need to rehearse her and her husband's history
of dishonesty, corruption, and irresponsibility, capped most
recently by her obvious breach of the statutes protecting
national security secrets.
As for Trump, was there ever a candidate more obviously
unqualified for high public office, as measured by his dearth
of relevant knowledge and experience, his willfulness and
self-absorption, his compulsive lying and inconsistency, his
manipulative using of other people, his smash-mouth rhetoric
and low character? For anyone professing conservative
principles, the first problem with Trump is that he is not
one of us, has never been one of us, shows no sign or capacity
of becoming one of us, and hardly cares to pretend to be one
of us. Even "what about the Supreme Court?" has no grip on my
conscience when I try to imagine Donald Trump in the Oval
Office. I cannot trust him to choose judicial nominees wisely,
and there are other things whose cumulative weight is greater
even than this variable.
After a lifetime of studying politics, I have finally, thanks
to the electoral annus horribilis of 2016, arrived at an ethic
of voting that I can defend against all rival ethics. It is
simply this: Vote as if your ballot determines nothing
whatsoever—except the shape of your own character. Vote as if
the public consequences of your action weigh nothing next to
the private consequences. The country will go whither it will
go, when all the votes are counted. What should matter the
most to you is whither you will go, on and after this
November's election day.
Pretty good advice.
My vote won't affect the outcome of the race for president. I live in
Maryland, a reliably blue state in presidential years. But even if I
lived in a swing state, I'd make the same choice.
I wrote in Senator Mike Lee.
Lee is a principled conservative. He is a thoughtful and consistent
advocate for limited government. He is a constitutionalist not because
it's popular these days but because he believes in the precepts of
founding.
I don't agree with Senator Lee on everything. I have concerns about his
proposals on criminal justice reform, and his views on national
security are more non-interventionist than mine. But our differences
come in considering how to limit government, not whether to limit it.
Lee has refused to endorse Donald Trump. But he has nonetheless tried
in good faith—in public and in private—to encourage Trump to embrace
those things he considers important. And he has given serious,
substantive reasons for his decision. (See my interview with Lee from
the Republican National Convention this summer, here.) Opposing the
nominee of your party, even one as deeply flawed as Donald Trump, takes
a certain amount of political courage. And with the exception of Ben
Sasse, Jeff Flake, Larry Hogan, and Charlie Baker, too few elected
Republicans this year have shown it.I w
I was de registered by Calif. bigot brown sand nigger Alex Padilla, I have scot white name, he is la raza. USA long gone.
Stanislaus Stewart
2016-11-08 22:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
I spend a lot of time these days wondering if anyone has ever given
more thought to a relatively meaningless vote than I have this year.
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor, an almost comical
narcissist and a reflexive bigot. I'm not easily offended, and he has
offended me pretty consistently over the course of this campaign,
beginning with his announcement speech. The list is as familiar as it
is long: His mockery of POWs, his ridicule of the disabled, his
reliable misogyny, his open prejudice, his casual and unapologetic
dishonesty, his contempt for ideas and people who care about them.
As I think about the future of the country and the lives of my three
(soon to be four) children, two challenges stand out: national security
and debt. Government shouldn't do much, but it should keep its citizens
safe and it should not burden future generations with debt incurred by
politicians making promises to current ones. Trump complains about the
$20 trillion in debt and opposes reforming the entitlements most
responsible for it. His views on national security range from aspiring
authoritarian to naïve neo-isolationist, and his decisionmaking in
matters of world affairs appears to be driven by ego and bravado rather
than any kind of worldview or national strategy. There is, in my view,
no chance a Trump presidency would seriously address the debt and a
good chance that it would increase global instability and threats to
the U.S. homeland.
Trump doesn't believe in limited government—at all. To the extent he's
made limited government arguments during the campaign, he's done so for
transparently political reasons. But he's also repeatedly made clear
his comfort with a powerful, intrusive federal government. He's argued
for severe restrictions on the First Amendment, for dramatically higher
taxes, for expanded entitlements, for new regulations on businesses,
for single-payer health care. To the extent Trump has views about
policy that don't directly affect his own well being, he is a
progressive.
So, no—I'm not voting for Donald Trump. (For more of my concerns about
Trump, click here and here.)
And despite the fevered speculation of some Trump supporters, I will
not vote for Hillary Clinton, either. She has campaigned for president
as an extension of the Obama presidency, which has been disastrous,
In what way has Obama's presidency been 'disastrous?'
Post by Ubiquitous
particularly on the urgent issues of debt and national security. If
that alone weren't enough to disqualify her, then her almost
contemptuous disregard for the rules and laws that govern other public
officials and the rest of the country surely is.
This isn't new. In 1996, William Safire memorably described Mrs.
Clinton as a "congenital liar." In hindsight, that seems almost
generous, as if her behavior was inherited, not chosen. In light of
what we've seen since, we could add other, more accurate descriptors.
She's a habitual liar, an aggressive liar, an arrogant liar. She's a
comfortable liar, an unrepentant liar, even an eager liar. Go back and
review her press conference at the United Nations on March 10, 2015.
She offered excuses and justifications and explanations for her private
email server—and virtually everything she said about it was misleading
or flat-out untrue. (For more of my concerns about Clinton, see here.)
It's no wonder, then, that so many Americans dislike the two major-
party candidates. When Fox News asked voters in late August whether
they believe "Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are terrible
candidates", nearly half of the country (44 percent) responded in the
affirmative. An NBC poll out this week found that 62 percent of
Americans say the election has made them feel "less proud" of America.
(In 2012, only 12 percent said the same thing.)
I'm one of them. So, what should I do? Among the best things I read as
I considered this question was an article published this summer from
Neither Trump nor Clinton has a single redeeming characteristic
that recommends him or her to the presidency of the United
States—at least none that is not decisively outweighed by some
other damning characteristic. Clinton's much vaunted
"experience" is a career record of ghastly misjudgments in
foreign policy, paired with a consistently authoritarian and
illiberal "progressivism" in domestic policy, seemingly intent
on unraveling the social fabric that makes a decent society.
And there is no need to rehearse her and her husband's history
of dishonesty, corruption, and irresponsibility, capped most
recently by her obvious breach of the statutes protecting
national security secrets.
As for Trump, was there ever a candidate more obviously
unqualified for high public office, as measured by his dearth
of relevant knowledge and experience, his willfulness and
self-absorption, his compulsive lying and inconsistency, his
manipulative using of other people, his smash-mouth rhetoric
and low character? For anyone professing conservative
principles, the first problem with Trump is that he is not
one of us, has never been one of us, shows no sign or capacity
of becoming one of us, and hardly cares to pretend to be one
of us. Even "what about the Supreme Court?" has no grip on my
conscience when I try to imagine Donald Trump in the Oval
Office. I cannot trust him to choose judicial nominees wisely,
and there are other things whose cumulative weight is greater
even than this variable.
After a lifetime of studying politics, I have finally, thanks
to the electoral annus horribilis of 2016, arrived at an ethic
of voting that I can defend against all rival ethics. It is
simply this: Vote as if your ballot determines nothing
whatsoever—except the shape of your own character. Vote as if
the public consequences of your action weigh nothing next to
the private consequences. The country will go whither it will
go, when all the votes are counted. What should matter the
most to you is whither you will go, on and after this
November's election day.
Pretty good advice.
My vote won't affect the outcome of the race for president. I live in
Maryland, a reliably blue state in presidential years. But even if I
lived in a swing state, I'd make the same choice.
I wrote in Senator Mike Lee.
Lee is a principled conservative. He is a thoughtful and consistent
advocate for limited government. He is a constitutionalist not because
it's popular these days but because he believes in the precepts of
founding.
I don't agree with Senator Lee on everything. I have concerns about his
proposals on criminal justice reform, and his views on national
security are more non-interventionist than mine. But our differences
come in considering how to limit government, not whether to limit it.
Lee has refused to endorse Donald Trump. But he has nonetheless tried
in good faith—in public and in private—to encourage Trump to embrace
those things he considers important. And he has given serious,
substantive reasons for his decision. (See my interview with Lee from
the Republican National Convention this summer, here.) Opposing the
nominee of your party, even one as deeply flawed as Donald Trump, takes
a certain amount of political courage. And with the exception of Ben
Sasse, Jeff Flake, Larry Hogan, and Charlie Baker, too few elected
Republicans this year have shown it.
So, Mike Lee for President.
Or one vote for Mike Lee, anyway.
clairbear
2016-11-12 13:31:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stanislaus Stewart
In what way has Obama's presidency been 'disastrous?'
Where have you been for the last 8 years
'fast and furious'
The sham and failure known as Obamacare
Worsening of race realtion
The so called rest with Russia
The fake economic recovery
the rise of ISIS
Benghazi
The misreading of the Arab Spring
The loss of respect of many nations of the world
and so many more errors and lies

None of the Above
2016-11-09 09:57:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
Beam Me Up Scotty
2016-11-09 10:12:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by None of the Above
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
You should just use a 2x4 between the eyes and have some mercy.
--
That's Karma


*Rumination*

The *Gruber Doctrine* is the Liberal plan that says it's "to the
Liberals advantage to have a lack of transparency and then lie about
everything"..
None of the Above
2016-11-10 09:30:35 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Nov 2016 05:12:09 -0500, Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by None of the Above
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
You should just use a 2x4 between the eyes and have some mercy.
Any sympathy I had last night has evaporated with the utter idiocy
displayed by the losers today.

Seems it's only wrong if ~Trump~ refuses to accept the election
outcome. Sheeyut, even Seattle City Klowncil Court Jester Kshama
Sawant (socialist) is threatening violence on inauguration day.
Governor Swill
2016-11-11 16:13:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by None of the Above
On Wed, 9 Nov 2016 05:12:09 -0500, Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by None of the Above
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
You should just use a 2x4 between the eyes and have some mercy.
Any sympathy I had last night has evaporated with the utter idiocy
displayed by the losers today.
Seems it's only wrong if ~Trump~ refuses to accept the election
outcome. Sheeyut, even Seattle City Klowncil Court Jester Kshama
Sawant (socialist) is threatening violence on inauguration day.
And somehow you think Trump and his voters wouldn't be doing the same
if they'd lost?

Swill
--
Comey says, "nevermind".

""Based on our review, we have not changed our conclusions that we
expressed in July with respect to Secretary Clinton," Comey wrote
Sunday."

"Since my letter, the FBI investigative team has been working around
the clock to process and review a large volume of emails from a device
obtained in connection with an unrelated criminal investigation,"
Comey wrote on Sunday. "During that process we reviewed all of the
communications that were to or from Hillary Clinton while she was
Secretary of State " I am very grateful to the professionals at the
FBI for doing an extraordinary amount of high-quality work in a short
period of time."
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fbi-director-comey-congress-new-letter-hillary-clinton-emails-still-no-charges/

#imwithher
Bob
2016-11-11 16:14:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Governor Swill
Post by None of the Above
On Wed, 9 Nov 2016 05:12:09 -0500, Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by None of the Above
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
You should just use a 2x4 between the eyes and have some mercy.
Any sympathy I had last night has evaporated with the utter idiocy
displayed by the losers today.
Seems it's only wrong if ~Trump~ refuses to accept the election
outcome. Sheeyut, even Seattle City Klowncil Court Jester Kshama
Sawant (socialist) is threatening violence on inauguration day.
And somehow you think Trump and his voters wouldn't be doing the same
if they'd lost?
Swill
Speculation.
Wayne
2016-11-11 18:03:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Governor Swill
Post by None of the Above
On Wed, 9 Nov 2016 05:12:09 -0500, Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by Beam Me Up Scotty
Post by None of the Above
Post by Ubiquitous
I knew long before he became the Republican nominee that I could never
vote for Donald Trump. He's an ignoramus and a boor
That's 'President-elect Boor'...
You should just use a 2x4 between the eyes and have some mercy.
Any sympathy I had last night has evaporated with the utter idiocy
displayed by the losers today.
Seems it's only wrong if ~Trump~ refuses to accept the election
outcome. Sheeyut, even Seattle City Klowncil Court Jester Kshama
Sawant (socialist) is threatening violence on inauguration day.
And somehow you think Trump and his voters wouldn't be doing the same
if they'd lost?
No I don't. Democrats are the ones who take to the streets for the
slightest issue. After all, Trump voters had to put up with 8 years of
Obama bullshit, and you never saw this kind of public bitching during
his two elections.
clairbear
2016-11-12 13:24:28 UTC
Permalink
I heard this on a radio at work the other day and thought it was a good
thing to share.If only all of us could do as Riaz Patel suggest , we'd
have more understanding in this nation

Editor’s Note: The following is a guest post by Riaz Patel.

Source: http://www.glennbeck.com/2016/11/10/what-a-gay-muslim-
pakistani-american-immigrant-learned-traveling-to-rural-alaska-the-week-
before-the-election/?utm_source=homepage&utm_medium=top-
stories&utm_campaign=homepage?
utm_source=glennbeck&utm_medium=contentcopy_link



Dear 59,668,724 Disappointed Americans,
I know this is a devastating day. Considering the toxic levels of
hatred and division unleashed over the past few years of campaigning,
either outcome was going to be a bitter pill for HALF of our nation to
swallow. Like all forms of mourning, it will take time to heal as we
mourn the loss of our version of the next four years. But notice I said
OUR version. Because there is another one. And that one not only has a
lot of supporters, but has legally and definitively asserted it’s right
to be heard. It’s a perspective I didn’t know a lot about until
recently.
A few months ago I sat down with Glenn Beck for an intense chat about
hate in America. At some point he questioned why I lumped all “White
Americans” together when expressing a particular point of view. I
thought about that a lot. So, the next day I decided I needed to
understand the election from a perspective other than my own. On my
drive to work I found a Conservative radio station. The morning after, I
found another. And ever since, thanks to the power of satellite radio,
I’ve been crisscrossing the country, popping in to listen to local call-
in shows. Here’s what I learned by listening. Listening. Not waiting to
speak. Not waiting to disagree or refute. googletag.cmd.push(function()
{ googletag.display("div-gpt-ad-300x250_mid-gb_102"); }); There exists a
HUGE population in America who are desperately struggling to feed their
families. They feel their needs are not authentically represented within
this huge government. They feel their concerns are not being voiced by
any major news outlet. They are tired of being called “dumb,” “bigoted”
and “racist.” And, based on the shocked expressions of every anchor last
night that all their polling data was off, apparently they aren’t even
really counted. I was feeling such a groundswell of their frustration
and unhappiness – and even the strong possibility of a Trump victory –
that I decided last-minute to travel with my husband and our six-month
old daughter to Ketchikan, Alaska the weekend before the election.
RELATED: How Four People Sitting Around Can Change the Concept of Hate
Why? Because I wanted to meet these people. And I wanted them to meet
me. Before we had a “Winner.” How else would we understand each other
beyond the “black” and “white” which we BOTH have been painted, non-
stop, in this vicious election cycle. So, I went to breakfast at The
Landing on Tongass Avenue and discussed the stakes of the election with
third-generation fisherman and learned that their whole life’s work was
at stake based on potential Clinton fishing regulations. I talked
somewhat fervently about the cancer that is radical Islam with Nicole &
Jim, who ran the Black Bear Inn and discussed how we all feel unsafe
these days. And I chatted with Paula, the 30-year bar manager, who
explained that almost all of Alaska is owned by the federal government
so each vote in this community is REALLY about their ability to support
their families. Over the course of two days, I met lovely people. Some I
agreed with and some I didn’t. Some of them had met a Muslim before and
others hadn’t. But all asked me earnest questions about my background,
and I asked about theirs. No question was offensive because the
intention was non-judgmental. On my flight back, I realized that for
many of us supporting Hillary, this election was about incredibly
important social issues. It was a moral election for us. To most of the
people I met on my trip, it was about survival. Literally. So when I
read Facebook/Twitter posts this morning vilifying 50% of the country
for being dumb or racist, I remember Nicole, Jim & Paula and I know
that’s not true. But how would I know that if I didn’t meet them and
talk to them with an open mind? Only by pulling up a few chairs to
PERSONIFY the people we think we hate, will we move beyond “black” and
“white” to the way the world really is: grey. Grey is the only way. As I
walk around my office today, people are in shock. It’s no surprise
people are surprised by the results when they refused to let an opposing
viewpoint in. What did most of my Hillary supporting friends do when
someone disagreed with their politics on Facebook? They “Unfriended”
them. And when even Jake Tapper on CNN makes the mistake of saying “we”
instead of “she” as he refers to winning Connecticut, we have to realize
we are in one giant echo chamber that extends to almost everyone we
speak to and almost every place we get information. This morning, I am
not surprised by the result. But I am slightly impressed by the notion
that all the celebrity power and campaign money in the nation was not
enough to continue to mute these Americans. They simply went to the
polls and voted for what was best for their family. Just as we all do.
And they won. Fairly. Now, before the chat threads blow up below this
article, I am not denying that some Trump supporters are racist. Of
course. But some Muslims are terrorists. The point is NOT ALL. I’ve seen
the clips of bigoted slurs being thrown out at Trump rallies. But, as a
TV producer, when I watch the footage aired, there aren’t a tons of
incidents. It’s a couple each time, played many, many times over. But if
a group of twenty idiotic Trump supporters yell ethnic slurs, is the
entire stadium “racist” by association? No. If a Black Lives Matters
supporter says it’s “open season on whites” is that a true
representation of the movement? No. Should I be viewed with suspicion
because I am a Muslim and some are terrorists? No. RELATED: How Backyard
Fence Conversations Could Save America The worst outcome of the election
is that we have each been reduced to a series of broad labels that no
longer reflect who we are. Mexican. White. Republican. Immigrant.
Muslim. We may try to look at people as “labels” but we’ll never truly
see them because THEY do not look at their own lives & families as
labels. If, in the misery of this morning’s election hangover, we choose
to continue to refer to Trump supporters as one collective “Them” I
think that is as offensive as anything else I’ve heard in this election
cycle and as ungracious as anything we feared from Trump supporters in
the defeat we assumed would be theirs. I think a key part of beginning
to heal is realizing Trump is not his supporters. Who he is and how he
campaigned are truly distasteful to me. But his supporters are not him.
They voted for a variety of reasons that are important and personal to
them. And when I was with them this past weekend, everyone I came across
showed me kindness & humanity. I hope, for their sake, the quality of
their life improves. And that they are able to continue to work and
provide their families with a safe and loving home. A home into which I
hope to be invited.








Source: http://www.glennbeck.com/2016/11/10/what-a-gay-muslim-
pakistani-american-immigrant-learned-traveling-to-rural-alaska-the-week-
before-the-election/?utm_source=homepage&utm_medium=top-
stories&utm_campaign=homepage?
utm_source=glennbeck&utm_medium=contentcopy_link




http://www.glennbeck.com/2016/11/10/what-a-gay-muslim-pakistani-
american-immigrant-learned-traveling-to-rural-alaska-the-week-before-
the-election/?utm_source=homepage&utm_medium=top-
stories&utm_campaign=homepage
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...